Search Results: "Ying-Hwa Hu"


BOOK REVIEW

A FISH TO FEED by Ellen Mayer
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 25, 2015

"A straightforward, informative, and joyous read for both parent and child. (Board book. 9-18 mos.)"
A young tot buys a fish with her father. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RED SOCKS by Ellen Mayer
by Ellen Mayer, illustrated by Ying-Hwa Hu
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 25, 2015

"A sweet story that instructs parents as well as delighting babies. (Board book. 3-9 mos.)"
A little one hunts for a missing sock. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2012

"Kudos for the effort, but a more illuminating text and more suitable illustrations would have made this a much better title. (author's note, photographs) (Picture book/biography. 3-7)"
Florence Mills, dancer and singer, was the sweetheart of the Harlem Renaissance. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JIGSAW PONY by Jessie Haas
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2005

"With ample horsey details, generous white space, large typeface and a predictable but exciting story line, Haas's true-to-life story is one young horse lovers and young readers alike will enjoy. (Fiction. 6-9)"
Twins Kiera and Fran fight over everything. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JEWELS by Belinda Rochelle
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"This rosy memory piece paints a fond picture of intergenerational affection, cozily augmented with dappled watercolors; it's a sustaining, family-centered milieu, lovingly reflected in the misty-eyed, dreamy expressions on Lea Mae's and her relatives' faces. (Picture book. 5-8)"
African-American heritage and history is personally lauded in a summer of stories told to Lea Mae by her great-grandmother Lea Mae, or 'Ma dear, for whom she is named. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JINGLE DANCER by Cynthia Leitich Smith
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 30, 2000

"A useful portrayal of an important cultural event in a Creek girl's year. (author's note, glossary) (Picture book. 5-9)"
A contemporary Native American girl follows in her grandmother's footsteps (literally and figuratively), dancing the traditional jingle dance at the powwow. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"The result is not seamless when read in one sitting, but the author maintains a storyteller's pace and penchant for exaggeration until the tales humorously blur the lines between what is fable and what is true. (b&w illustrations, notes, not seen) (Short stories. 8-12)"
Tate (Front Porch Stories at the One Room School, 1992, etc.) celebrates African-American storytelling and small-town life in a collection of seven funny, folksy tales spun around proverbs, e.g., ``Big Things Come in Small Packages,'' and ``Slow and Steady Wins the Race.'' Exaggerated characters—ranging from a fish-finding basset hound and Bron Kitis, the Hand Fish King of Nutbrush County, Missouri, to Taneshia and Sudsey in their high-flying search for a boyfriend—have a folkloric, larger-than-life appeal. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PRINCESS GRACE by Mary Hoffman
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 2008

"Just right. (Picture book. 5-10)"
Grace longs to be chosen to be a princess in the town parade. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Nov. 1, 2006

Sticking closely to historical records and current scholarship, Pringle follows up Dog of Discovery: A Newfoundland's Adventures with Lewis and Clark (2002) with this handsome tribute to Clark's near-lifelong companion and slave. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DANCE Y’ALL by Bettye Stroud
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"A quiet story useful for children dealing with fear. (Picture book. 6-8)"
Jack Henry is excited that his kinfolk are coming to celebrate the harvest, but he's seen a coach-whip snake in the barn, where he and his cousin will be spending the night to make room for the company. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"Her coverage of each person is so brief that this won't be useful for reports, but it might be used as a browser by students, or for teachers to introduce a unit. (Nonfiction. 6-10)"
Thirteen distinguished American Indians, from Tisquantum and Sacajawea to Wilma Mankiller and Sherman Alexie, are profiled here. Read full book review >