Search Results: "Zhu Hong"


BOOK REVIEW

THE SERENITY OF WHITENESS by Zhu Hong
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 16, 1992

"A moving, if relentless, document of Chinese women's lives."
From contemporary Chinese women writers: a powerful but uneven collection of stories unified by unsubtle displeasure with the conditions of women in China. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A MEMOIR OF MISFORTUNE by Su Xiaokang
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 25, 2001

"American readers might prefer more details about the couple's life in China and America, but this is not the author's purpose. He has written not so much an autobiography as a painful rumination on fate."
A Chinese journalist now living in the US tries to make sense of his life after a tragedy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR UNCERTAINTY: by Jiahui Zhu
Released: March 9, 2012

"A work that illuminates some intriguing mathematical and logical relationships but doesn't remove them from the field of debate."
Zhu's nonfiction debut offers a mathematical model for proving the relationship between uncertainty and success—if one accepts the philosophical premises it's built on. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOVELY by Jess  Hong
by Jess Hong, illustrated by Jess Hong
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2017

"'Lovely is different, weird, and wonderful.' So reads the caption for a white girl with blonde hair and one blue and one brown eye! A simple book with lots of truth. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Beauty is said to be in the eye of the beholder, and this book encourages readers to regard everyone as "lovely." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MAGPIE BRIDGE by Liu Hong
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2004

"Despite flashes of insight and precision, for the most part Tie's stories are contrived and self-consciously exotic, while Mei's odyssey is strangely lifeless. Together they don't add up to a whole."
First published in Great Britain, where Hong has lived since 1989, this schematic US debut twines the story of a young woman's life in contemporary England with the history of her ancestors in China. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SUMMER OF BETRAYAL by Hong Ying
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1997

"But the novel is clogged with highly charged melodramatic language (as translated), and the tedious amorality and apostrophizing of the bohemian culture Lin Ying moves through can make you feel as if you're reading Jack Kerouac's The Subterraneans in Chinese."
Summer Of Betrayal ($21.00; Jun. 1997; 208 pp.; 0-374-27175-5): First published in Taiwan in 1992, this impassioned novel describes the emotional life of a young woman poet in the wake of the 1989 massacre of dissident students in Tiananmen Square. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I LOVE DOLLARS by Zhu Wen
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2007

"A jaundiced view of post-communist chaos. No heroism, no transcendence, just all-too-human desperation."
Living out a dull, bad dream of botched politics, the stunted characters in these novellas exist in a no-man's-land, halfway between the failed utopia of Chairman Mao and the promise of McDonald's, Macintosh and MTV. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Nanjing Never Cries by Hong Zheng
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 7, 2016

"A well-researched and capably written depiction of the Rape of Nanjing and its effects on victims and survivors."
American and Chinese academics face the horrors of invasion in the early days of World War II. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DAUGHTER OF THE RIVER by Hong Ying
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"A major writer emerges here, combining flawlessly the often broken dreams of youth and the usually broken dream of politics. (Author tour)"
A memoir of growing up amid poverty in contemporary urban China—at once lyrical and brutal. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHINA MEN by Maxine Hong Kingston
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 13, 1980

"But, self-conscious lapses aside, this remains in sum—like Warrior Woman—exemplary history in the personal, investigatory mode."
What began with The Warrior Woman—Chinese immigrant women—is now continued with the focus on the China Men who left China for the Gold Mountain; and all of Kingston's different impulses—curatorial, reconstructive, celebratory, quizzical—are again brought into play. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KEPT by Y. Euny Hong
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2006

"Not for nothing does Hong begin the book with a quote from Thackeray; this is Vanity Fair's close cousin."
Judith Lee, Ivy League daughter of a distinguished Korean family, is ready to start her life. Read full book review >