Search Results: "Zora Neale Hurston"


BOOK REVIEW

MULES AND MEN by Zora Neale Hurston
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 10, 1935

"Illustrator — Miguel Covarrubias."
A collection, made by the author, herself a negress (remember her novel last year, Jonah's Gourd Vine?), of negro folk stories and songs. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 1999

"This volume represents part of Hurston's effort to capture that critical momoent in the development of black folklore, which included the creation of a new prison folk hero, Daddy Mention."
New work by Hurston (1889—1968), the Harlem Renaissance writer and folklorist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DUST TRACKS ON A ROAD by Zora Neale Hurston
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 4, 1942

"A different kind of a book, absorbing, human, entertaining, with occasional strong flavor."
A refreshing, energetic autobiography of the unusual Negro author who refused to accept an inferiority complex and struggled for a successful career and a positive, constructive life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SERAPH ON THE SUWANEE by Zora Neale Hurston
Released: Oct. 11, 1948

"For women, although the sales possibilities are not too strong."
A fair enough novel, of western Florida at the beginning of the century, this has to do with Arvay Henson who, as a young girl, becomes a religious fanatic in order to, forget a disappointing affair, but who gives this up when she meets and marries handsome, Irish Jim Merserve. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THEIR EYES WERE WATCHING GOD by Zora Neale Hurston
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 16, 1937

"A poignant story, told with almost rhythmic beauty."
I loved Jonah's Gourd Vine — thought some of her short stories very fine — and feel that this measures up to the promise of the early books. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Dec. 3, 2001

"A rich harvest of native storytelling."
This entertaining collection, which was left unpublished in 1929 and only recently unearthed, is a fine companion to Hurston's earlier volumes, Tell My Horse (1937) and Mules and Men (1935). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 1979

"Indeed it is—and fittingly presented at last."
Zora Neale Hurston, who left her Florida home at 14 to become a maid, became instead part of the Harlem Renaissance and one of America's most prolific black women writers during her 30-year career as novelist, journalist, and folklorist (Franz Boas-trained). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LIES by Zora Neale Hurston
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2005

"Varied type styles, textures, sizes and arrangements reflect the chorus of voices echoed here, in the vibrant, ever-changing language the artist likes to hear on street corners, hair salons and 'the right kind of eating establishments.' (Picture book. 6-10)"
"Once I seen / a man so ugly, / they threw him / in Dog River / and they could skim ugly / for six months. / You think he was ugly? / I seen a man/ so ugly, / he can go behind / a jimson weed / and hatch / monkeys." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SIX FOOLS by Zora Neale Hurston
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 2006

"Whatever its trappings, the tale remains one of the drollest folktales around, and even young readers already familiar with it will be heartily amused by this lively American rendition. (Picture book/folktale. 6-9)"
Richly hued oil monoprints in a childlike style give this Caribbean-flavored variant on "The Three Sillies" a rural African-American setting. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2004

"Hurston's work merits a less clumsy introduction to young readers, and Mary Lyon's Raw Head, Bloody Bones (1991) is only one of many similar folktale gatherings with a higher chill factor. (Folktales. 8-10)"
A talking mule, a talking skull, a witch who slips her skin, and a man so powerful that he's not admitted to heaven or hell star in this appealing but flawed companion to What's The Hurry, Fox? and Other Animal Stories (p. 331), illustrated by Bryan Collier. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHAT’S THE HURRY, FOX? by Zora Neale Hurston
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2004

"Younger audiences might not know Hurston as a folklorist; here's help for that, in an inviting mix of new tales and familiar ones made fresh. (Folk tales. 7-10)"
Thomas polishes up nine anecdotes and pourquoi tales collected by Hurston, but only recently rediscovered (along with hundreds more) and published in a collection for adults. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE THREE WITCHES by Zora Neale Hurston
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2006

"Includes adapter's and illustrator's notes and tributes to Hurston. (Picture book/folktale. 6-10)"
"Three witches had already eaten a boy and girl's mother and father, so their grandmother took them to live with her far off in the woods." Read full book review >