Search Results: "barbara kingsolver"


BOOK REVIEW

PIGS IN HEAVEN by Barbara Kingsolver
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 30, 1993

"Not the truly wonderful book it might have been—characters who seem important disappear; carefully marked trails turn out to be merely picaresque, leading nowhere—but a terrific read nonetheless."
For what's hoped to be a "break-out book," a greatly gifted storyteller returns to the characters and settings of her celebrated first novel (The Bean Trees, 1987). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Nov. 15, 1989

"A better read would be Kingsolver's own short story 'Why I Am a Danger to the Public' (from Homeland), which needs fewer than 20 pages to present a vivid fictionalized version, including violent hostility between striking and scab families; the arrival of heavily armed State Police; evictions from company housing, etc. Provocative but limited: the makings of a few excellent magazine articles fall short as a book."
Acclaimed fiction-writer Kingsolver (The Bean Trees, 1987); Homeland and Other Stories, p. 572) worked as a journalist covering the strike against the Phelps Dodge Copper Corporation (June 1983 to about December 1985) that shook the economic and social order in several isolated Arizona towns. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOMELAND AND OTHER STORIES by Barbara Kingsolver
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1989

"No crescendos here, then, but, still, a lovely repertoire."
From the author of the well-received The Bean Trees (1987), 12 far-reaching and mostly affecting stories that seem wise in the ways of many places—from Kentucky to Arizona to the island of St. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BARBARA BUSH by Rose Blue
BIOGRAPHY
Released: June 1, 1991

"Illustrations not seen; chronology; further reading; index. (Biography. 11+)"
An entry in the ``Contemporary Women'' series pays admiring tribute to its subject: Blue and Naden cast every aspect of the First Lady's life in a glow. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PRODIGAL SUMMER by Barbara Kingsolver
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2000

"This deservedly popular writer takes risks that most of her contemporaries wouldn't touch with the proverbial ten-foot pole. Prodigal Summer is another triumphant vindication of her very distinctive art."
A complex web of human and natural struggle and interdependency is analyzed with an invigorating mixture of intelligence and warmth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HIGH TIDE IN TUCSON by Barbara Kingsolver
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Oct. 11, 1995

"Mined selectively, however, this will reveal some beautiful gems."
In this collection of essays, novelist Kingsolver (Pigs in Heaven, 1993, etc.) displays considerable nature-writing talent, punctuated by stretches of smarmy self-reflection and hit-or-miss musings on issues ranging from biological determinism to the Gulf War. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANIMAL DREAMS by Barbara Kingsolver
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1990

"A promising miss."
Kingsolver (The Bean Trees, 1987; Homeland, 1989; Holding the Line, 1989) now offers a complex but overly calculated novel—unsubtle messages set against spectacular southwestern scenery. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FLIGHT BEHAVIOR by Barbara Kingsolver
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 6, 2012

"One of Kingsolver's better efforts at preaching her politics and pulling heartstrings at the same time."
A young woman discovers her rural Tennessee community has been invaded by monarch butterflies in this effective tear-jerker cum environmental jeremiad from Kingsolver (The Lacuna, 2009, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE POISONWOOD BIBLE by Barbara Kingsolver
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1998

"A triumph."
The first novel in five years from the ever-popular Kingsolver (Pigs in Heaven, 1993, etc.) is a large-scale saga of an American family's enlightening and disillusioning African adventure. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LACUNA by Barbara Kingsolver
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 3, 2009

"A richly satisfying portrait of Mexico gives way to a preachy, padded and predictable chronicle of Red Scare America."
Unapologetically political metafiction from Kingsolver (Prodigal Summer, 2000, etc.) about the small mistakes or gaps (lacunas) that change history. Read full book review >

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April 4, 2017
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