Search Results: "guy gavriel"


BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN OF EARTH AND SKY by Guy Gavriel Kay
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 10, 2016

"The historical setting is lush, well-researched, and well-painted, but Kay runs a risk of readers finding the history to be his strongest character."
Kay (River of Stars, 2013, etc.) makes another incursion into a world but a quarter-turn from our own past in a historical fantasy connected by a thin thread of continuity to his Lions of Al-Rassan. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SUMMER TREE by Guy Gavriel Kay
Released: Oct. 31, 1985

"Direful, portentous stuff, with a cast of thousands, a blur of scenery, and patchy dramatics: impressively wrought but overcomplicated and coolly unengaging."
The intricate but sprawling and chilly opener of a trilogy entitled The Fionavar Tapestry—from an author whose claim to fame is that he helped Christopher Tolkien edit J.R.R.'s Silmarillion. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A SONG FOR ARBONNE by Guy Gavriel Kay
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 13, 1993

"Complex and compelling: one of the most impressive fantasies in a long time."
Kay's latest is very much in the vein of his well-received Tigana (1990): an exhilarating epic fantasy based loosely on medieval history. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RIVER OF STARS by Guy Gavriel Kay
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 2, 2013

"Lucid and lyrical, and skillfully written, with the sweep of an old-fashioned Pearl S. Buck or James A. Michener saga."
An elegant, imaginative inhabitation of Song-dynasty China of 1,000 years ago by prolific historical novelist Kay (A Song for Arbonne, 1993, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DARKEST ROAD by Guy Gavriel Kay
Released: Nov. 17, 1986

"Fans only."
Book three of the fantasy trilogy (The Summer Tree, 1984; The Wandering Fire, p. 752), winding up the prodigiously heavy struggle between the numerous good guys and the legions of the evil Rakoth Maugrim. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LORD OF EMPERORS by Guy Gavriel Kay
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 7, 2000

"Essential reading for all Kay fans."
This second installment of Torontoresident Kay's latest fantasy epic, following Sailing to Sarantium (1999, not reviewed), brings to a conclusion the story of Crispin, the mosaicist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LION OF AL-RASSAN by Guy Gavriel Kay
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 1, 1995

"A notch below Kay's peak form, but still on a higher level of artistry than the work of almost any other current fantasy writer."
Kay's recent work has built up fantasy worlds based on Mediterranean models: Tigana (1990) was modeled on Italy, A Song For Arbonne (1993) on Provence. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TIGANA by Guy Gavriel Kay
Released: Sept. 7, 1990

"A bravura performance, nearly impossible to put down unfinished anywhere in the last 300 pages; odds are we'll see it on more than one award ballot next year."
Kay is probably best known for his neo-Arthurian trilogy, "The Fionavar Tapestry," which drew mixed notices; this big new novel should establish him as an important independent voice. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WANDERING FIRE by Guy Gavriel Kay
Released: June 27, 1986

"Gnarled prose, heavy-handed proceedings, lots of mythological borrowings and not too much originality: the recipe as before, in short, and thus only for enthusiasts."
Book Two of the trilogy begun with The Summer Tree (1984); alas, like its predecessor, hard-working but overwrought, overcomplicated, and dourly unengaging. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BAD GUY by Hannah Barnaby
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 9, 2017

"The humor feels accidental here, with illustrations that fail to establish a consistent visual subtext. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Another wannabe bad guy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: July 3, 2012

"Encouragement and instructive pointers in a package guy writers will enjoy. (Nonfiction. 8-12)"
Guys love writing as much as they love reading...when they can do their own thing. Read full book review >