Search Results: "walter dean myers"


BOOK REVIEW

GLORIOUS ANGELS by Walter Dean Myers
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 30, 1995

"A gilt lily. (Picture book. 4-10)"
A disappointing followup to the sensational Brown Angels (1993). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JAZZ by Walter Dean Myers
FICTION
Released: Sept. 30, 2006

"This offering stands as a welcome addition to the literature of jazz: In a genre all too often done poorly for children, it stands out as one of the few excellent treatments. (Picture book/poetry. 8+)"
A cycle of 15 poems and vivid, expressive paintings celebrate that most American genre of music: jazz. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OH, SNAP! by Walter Dean Myers
Released: Aug. 1, 2013

"Myers once again offers a story of smart kids living out their middle school days as Cruisers 'on the high seas of life.' (Fiction. 9-13)"
The fourth installment of the Cruisers series finds Zander Scott and friends unwittingly involved in an international investigation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A STAR IS BORN by Walter Dean Myers
Released: Aug. 1, 2012

"This fine volume easily stands on its own, but readers will look forward to the fourth book, already in the works. (Fiction. 9-13)"
In the third installment of the series, Myers offers another slice of middle school life at Harlem's Da Vinci Academy for gifted and talented students. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GAME by Walter Dean Myers
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Feb. 1, 2008

"A good match with Myers's Monster (1999) and Slam (1996). (Fiction. 11+)"
Drew Lawson is a basketball player in Harlem with "big-money dreams." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

POETRY
Released: Nov. 1, 2004

"Sure to be a classic. (Poetry. 12+)"
In this Whitman-esque ode to time and the city, the "crazy quilt patterns" of Harlem are reflected in the voices of the neighborhood's "big-time people and its struggling folk," of little girls and blind old veterans, poets and mechanics, boxers and nannies, ballplayers and blues singers, laborers and jazz artists. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NONFICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 2004

"A worthy introduction to a fascinating subject. (timeline, bibliography) (Nonfiction. 9-14)"
A solid history of Antarctic exploration takes readers from the times when it was known simply as Terra Australis Incognita to the present—and beyond. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MONSTER by Walter Dean Myers
Released: May 31, 1999

In a riveting novel from Myers (At Her Majesty's Request, 1999, etc.), a teenager who dreams of being a filmmaker writes the story of his trial for felony murder in the form of a movie script, with journal entries after each day's action. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 1, 1999

"The hallmarks of Myers's work—thorough research and solid writing—are evident here. (Fiction. 8-14)"
The teenage son of a former slave joins a cattle drive from Texas to Abilene, Kansas, in an entry in the My Name is America series. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

POETRY
Released: April 30, 1998

Myers (Brown Angels, 1993; Glorious Angels, 1995; etc.) has gathered another collection of vintage photographs of African-American mothers and children, with a few fathers thrown into the mix, and a good number of solo shots of babies, young gentlemen, and young ladies. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SLAM! by Walter Dean Myers
FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1996

"Persuasive. (Fiction. 12-15)"
A Harlem teenager learns how to apply the will he has to win at hoops to other parts of his life in this vivid, fluent story from Myers (Toussaint L'Ouverture, p. 1472, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

POETRY
Released: Oct. 30, 1993

"Sweet wondrous life to live' seems—well, sweet, it's also piquantly ironic in light of the struggles awaiting these promising, much-beloved children. (Poetry. 5+)"
Enchanting period photos of young African-Americans, which Myers collected from "dusty bins in antique shops, flea markets, auction houses, and museum collections." Read full book review >

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April 4, 2017
Emma Donoghue