Gregg Hurwitz
author of DON'T LOOK BACK
Bestselling thriller writer Hurwitz adds to his string of imaginative novels with Don't Look Back, an action-adventure story ready for blockbuster Hollywood. We talk to Hurwitz about the Mexican setting of the novel and how he keeps readers turning pages.


Hurwitz (Tell No Lies, 2013, etc.) again proves himself a plot master as he follows Eve Hardaway on a much-needed vacation into Mexico’s Oaxacan jungles.

It was supposed to be an anniversary trip. Then Eve’s husband found a younger, more "elegant" woman. Eve decided the prepaid getaway to Días Felices Ecolodge was just the ticket anyway, especially after having given up nursing for a mind-numbing corporate cubicle to support her son. At the lodge, Eve stumbles upon a lost digital camera while on a jungle trek and later learns that it belongs to Theresa Hamilton, now missing. On the same trek, Eve spies a mysterious man near a ramshackle hut secreted in the dense foliage. After deftly creating empathy for Eve, Hurwitz drops her into live-or-die circumstances, buoyed only by her shaky but ever growing self-confidence and love for her son. The mystery jungle dweller is slowly revealed to be Bashir Ahmat al-Gilani, the Bear of Bajaur, a bloodthirsty terrorist hiding in Mexico and a character written with inventive back story. If Días Felices is a jungle Ship of Fools, characters run to type: macho "Gay Jay," healing after a bad romance; Will, his straight best friend, the McGyver that Eve needs; Claire, a lonely, bitter and vocal young woman handicapped by leg braces; Harry and Sue, an older couple more interested in personal safety than group survival; and jungle-wise Fortunato, indígenio lodge cook. In a plot as fast as river rapids, Eve fights more battles than Rambo and copes with intermittent Internet connections, a satellite phone that only occasionally gets a signal, gangrene, dysentery, disembowelment by IED and a "black wave" of "eat-everything-in-their-path" sweeper ants. Hurwitz relates Oaxaca imaginatively, with a villain who reminds a soccer mom that "jungle laws had always run beneath it all, a molten stream under the bedrock."

Hurwitz adds to his string of imaginative thrillers with an action-adventure story ready for blockbuster Hollywood—get Cameron Diaz’s people!

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Upcoming Kirkus Interviews

December 8, 2015
Laura Lane and Angela Spera