Kate Beaton
Kate Beaton is the author/illustrator of the No. 1 New York Times bestseller Hark! A Vagrant! Now she is also a picture book author and illustrator with the recent release of The Princess and the Pony. Princess Pinecone knows exactly what she wants for her birthday this year. A big horse. A strong horse. A horse fit for a warrior princess! But when the day arrives, she doesn't quite get the horse of her dreams. “Where else can readers find hipster warriors, anime influences, perfectly placed fart jokes, a hidden ugly-sweater contest, and a skirmish packed with delightful nonsense (llamas! knights! hot dogs! turtle costumes!)—and have it all make such wonderful sense?” writes our reviewer in a starred review. “Instead of breaking bones, this warrior princess breaks the mold—and Beaton is in a class of her own.”


KIRKUS REVIEW

A half-pint warrior princess wants a battle-ready horse for her birthday but instead receives a little farting pony—who brilliantly defies all expectation.

Pinecone is small and young, and normally she receives cozy sweaters for presents, but she has a warrior’s determination. With this, she attempts to train her sweet, round pony—but to no avail. They are clearly outmatched at the big battle, yet Pinecone shows her mettle, and under the pony’s innocent gaze, hardened warriors melt into sweater-wearing softies. The artist’s digital illustrations, done in an earthy palette, have a warm, handcrafted feel. As majestic horses, iconic warriors (from Genghis Khan to Robin Hood), and cool tools are juxtaposed with Pinecone and her vacant-eyed pony, differences in stature, weaponry, and achievement are cleverly emphasized. Cinematic in layout and perfectly set-dressed, each page will elicit a new round of giggles. Beaton blurs the boundaries of traditional storytelling, marrying fantasy elements to pop culture with a free-associative swagger. This emerging genre, with its zinelike irreverence and joyful comedy, is hip, modern, and absolutely refreshing. Where else can readers find hipster warriors, anime influences, perfectly placed fart jokes, a hidden ugly-sweater contest, and a skirmish packed with delightful nonsense (llamas! knights! hot dogs! turtle costumes!)—and have it all make such wonderful sense?

Instead of breaking bones, this warrior princess breaks the mold—and Beaton is in a class of her own. (Picture book. 3-8)


Recent Interviews

Katey Sagal

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April 10, 2017
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Emma Donoghue

author of THE LOTTERYS PLUS ONE

April 3, 2017
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