LAND OF LOVE AND DROWNING by Tiphanie Yanique
Kirkus Star

LAND OF LOVE AND DROWNING

KIRKUS REVIEW

A debut novel traces the history of the U.S. Virgin Islands through the fate of a family marked by lust, magic and social change.

Of the atoll where her parents met, Anette Bradshaw says: "You seen even a postcard of Anegada? It too pretty. Like heaven and hell marry up and birth all the beauty goodness and badness could possibly make." Anette's is one of four narrative voices in this novel by St. Thomas–born Yanique (How to Escape from a Leper Colony, 2010), which follows the story of the children and grandchildren of Capt. Owen Arthur Bradshaw, a man whose unchecked appetites cause trouble for a good half-century after his ship goes down. In alternating short chapters, we hear from a wise, playful third-person narrator and, in first person, from each of Bradshaws' three outlandishly beautiful children: Eeona, both his daughter and his lover; Anette, who never knew either of her parents before their untimely deaths; and Jacob, Bradshaw’s unacknowledged son by a back-street mistress. Eeona becomes an imperious queen of a woman who never gets over her love for her father, refusing even the suit of a fellow who proposes 70-odd times; she moves to St. John and becomes entangled with a lost character from the family romantic tree. Half siblings Anette and Jacob are also ruled by incestuous passion, though they are unaware of their relationship, which is only partially derailed by Jacob's sojourns on the mainland for military service and medical school. Their story is interwoven with both the folklore and history of the island: backward-facing feet, silver pubic hair and a race of demigods called the Duene are sprinkled among scenes of development, hurricanes, tourism and the social movements of the 1960s and '70s.

Bubbling with talent and ambition, this novel is a head-spinning Caribbean cocktail.

 

Pub Date: July 10th, 2014
ISBN: 978-1-59448-833-7
Page count: 368pp
Publisher: Riverhead
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 15th, 2014




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