Abby Diamond

Abby Diamond was born in West Hills, California, a West San Fernando Valley suburb on the outskirts of Los Angeles. She grew up there with her brother, Jon.

Abby earned a BA in child development with a concentration in education and a minor in psychology. She is married, a mother, and currently lives in SC USA with her family.


Abby Diamond welcomes queries regarding:
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"Diamond’s debut is lighthearted and charming, but also offers believable personalities and a serious message about loving oneself. Illustrator Brayer (Where Dolphins Dive, 2015, etc.) helps tell the story with lovely, well-detailed, and emotionally expressive illustrations that feature appealing washes of watercolor. A good message about self-acceptance, backed by charming images."

Kirkus Reviews


AWARDS, PRESS & INTERESTS

Hometown West Hills, CA

Favorite word Family

Passion in life Family, children, and writing.


BOOKS REVIEWED BY KIRKUS:

CHILDREN'S & TEEN
Pub Date:
ISBN: 978-1-4826-8082-9
Page count: 46pp

In this illustrated book for young readers, an old train who feels useless is reminded that he can still make kids happy.

At Train Station Park, a children’s amusement venue, it’s Grand Opening Day. The star of the show is a brand-new shiny red engine: “Clickety-clack, clickety-clack, who’ll ride upon my back?” he asks the waiting crowd. All the boys and girls love riding this train, and he loves his job. Over time, though, his colors fade and he starts moving more slowly and unevenly. He eventually becomes known as Tipton “because of the way he tipped back and forth along the rails.” Children still love him, but the station master decides to add a new, sparkly engine named Jack. Tipton sulks (“Clickety-clack, clickety-clack, I’m no good; I just creak and I crack”) until he gets no more riders because “they thought Tipton didn’t want to see them.” Lonelier than ever, he decides to run away through a mysterious tunnel to Old Town, a work yard for broken appliances and old machinery. A silver tea cart named Carter helps him realize that his self-pity has prevented him from noticing how much the children still love him. Tipton gets repaired and goes back to Train Station Park, where the kids greet him with happy cheers. Diamond’s debut is lighthearted and charming, but also offers believable personalities and a serious message about loving oneself. It doesn’t exactly make sense, though, that the authorities at Train Station Park wouldn’t repair Tipton themselves; Old Town is also a little shaky conceptually, as it’s both a metaphorical heavenly afterlife for machines—‘the place where dreams come true’—and a way station for repairs. Overall, though, Diamond achieves a good balance between sympathy for Tipton’s old age and encouragement for him to do what he still can: delight children. Illustrator Brayer (Where Dolphins Dive, 2015, etc.) helps tell the story with lovely, well-detailed, and emotionally expressive illustrations that feature appealing washes of watercolor.

A good message about self-acceptance, backed by charming images. 


ADDITIONAL WORKS AVAILABLE:

I HAVE SEVERAL MORE CHILDREN'S BOOK AVAILABLE, AND I WILL UPDATE THE DETAILS FOR THESE BOOKS SOON. THESE INCLUDE: "TEDDY TIME," (Unpublished)


THE COLOR-ALONG ADVENTURES OF WILEY KYLIE [OR ... OF RILEY AND KYLIE] **TITLE IS TENTATIVE. (Unpublished)
Best suited for ages 4-6, Preschool to 1st Grade

A series of 3 short little stories each (or however one might want to publish it as... a single book, or, a set of two, three, and whatnot) —The main character or characters in each set takes children through each book, and, as part of the story, on each page, something new added to the uncolored picture, and is underlined in the text, along with one of the 8 basic colors that is to be used to locate the new item on that particular page with the crayon (1 box of 8 basic-colored crayons to come packaged with each set of 3 books). They use that underlined color to color in the object described on that page. This serves as visual association and reinforcement of what is learned on each page. As each short story progresses, the more the next page will become closer to completion, and colored in/completed, as well. By the last page, the complete picture will be shown, and should be all colored in. If a child needs help along the way, at any point, there will be a colored-in key of the complete picture at the back of each book (or, to avoid any spoilers for what is next to show up throughout the story, there can be a colored-in key of that page's specific new item following each page); they can also use the main key to check what they got right and where they may need more practice (for both the colors and/or items to be colored in). These are simple, fun, interactive, educational, and engaging little stories that follows the main character or characters through each little adventure. And this is a series that also has great potential to either become more complex, or add higher levels for kids of different ages and stages. The possibilities are endless with this one—subjects/themes that can keep going on about limitless subjects. ** Will upload sample of first series set as soon as I get the chance.

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