Genre
  • Biography & Memoir

James D. Geissinger, Jr.

Dr. Geissinger received his medical degree from Northwestern University in Chicago. With his postgraduate training temporarily interrupted during the Vietnam conflict, he served in the U.S. Air Force as a general surgeon. He then returned to Northwestern to complete a residency program in neurological surgery, which included one year of medical neurology at the University of Iowa. Geissinger then practiced his specialty for over 20 years in Tallahassee, Florida, during which time he was also the primary author of a number of scientific papers and book reviews published  ...See more >


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"“Geissinger’s memoir appeals on several levels: Medical students will likely find the advice useful, while readers with an interest in neurosurgery will appreciate the book’s focus on pioneering methods…. Valuable for medical school students as well as general memoir fans.”– Kirkus Reviews"

Kirkus Reviews


AWARDS, PRESS & INTERESTS

Dr. Jim Geissinger, Renaissance Man of Tallahassee and a Regional Pioneer of Neurosurgery, 2013

Favorite author Sir William Osler

Favorite book Harvey Cushing, A Life In Surgery

Favorite line from a book " Most men lead lives of quiet desperation and go to the grave with the song still in them"- Henry David Thoreau

Favorite word empathy

Unexpected skill or talent writing

Passion in life The wonderful outdoors of the woods, the mountains and the sea


BOOKS REVIEWED BY KIRKUS:

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Pub Date:
ISBN: 978-0984741809
Page count: 404pp

In his debut memoir, a retired neurosurgeon reflects on medical history, his varied career and personal matters.

Geissinger, schooled in the third generation of neurosurgery, came of age in the mid-1950s. His long, often arduous journey led to his successful practice and eventual teaching of neurosurgery. Here, the author is firmly entrenched in the past, and his appreciation of his field’s pioneers is reflected both in the book’s content and tone. The first half of the title is filled with numerous case histories, many of which depict the conditions and procedures during the discipline’s nascent stages. These early practitioners gave the author his healthy perspective on success—something, he maintains, that could benefit modern medical students. The second half of the book veers off its presumed course, when illness pushes Geissinger out of medicine and into careers as a rancher and furniture maker. Eventually, an opportunity arises to reconnect with medicine, this time as an instructor. Geissinger’s memoir appeals on several levels: Medical students will likely find the advice useful, while readers with an interest in neurosurgery will appreciate the book’s focus on pioneering methods. The author’s retired peers will likely relate to stories set during the “golden years.” Furthermore, his approach to this memoir is emblematic of the neurosurgery profession itself: meticulous and sharply compartmentalized. Geissinger painstakingly recounts his many endeavors, including time spent at a ranch “intensely studying the premier bulls to be auctioned off on [a] Saturday morning.” Patient anecdotes, however, would have been much more accessible if indexed by conditions and treatment.

Valuable for medical school students as well as general memoir fans.