Mary M. Barrow

Elinor Dore of the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library in Washington, D.C. praised Mary Mills Barrow for her “agile writing ability.” She went on to say that 'Small Moments: A Child’s View of the Civil Rights Movement' was “American history told with care and intelligence.” Michala Tyann, author of 'Drowning in Words' said “Fans of Kathryn Stockett’s 2009 'The Help' will appreciate Barrow’s 'Small Moments' …… a valuable tool to commemorate the steps made to combat racism in the 1960s and to educate readers about the lasting effects  ...See more >


Mary M. Barrow welcomes queries regarding:
Agent Representation
Events & Signings
Film Rights
Foreign Publication
Media Coverage
Networking
U.S. Publication

CONNECT WITH THIS AUTHOR



"Barrow effectively chronicles the slow fade of youthful earnestness and the searing disappointment of childhood realization"

Kirkus Reviews


AWARDS, PRESS & INTERESTS

Best Seller List, The Tennessean , 2014: SMALL MOMENTS: A CHILD'S MEMORIES OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT

Best Seller List, Parnassus Books (April), 2014: SMALL MOMENTS: A CHILD'S MEMORIES OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT

Best Seller List, Book Man Book Woman (April), 2014: SMALL MOMENTS: A CHILD'S MEMORIES OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT

American Academy of Dermatology Gold Triangle Award, 2006: Sun Protection for Life: Your Guide to a Lifetime of Healthy & Beautiful Skin

Honorable Mention, National Novel Writers, 1993: Lobster So Big He Had To Be The Devil


BOOKS REVIEWED BY KIRKUS:

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Pub Date:
ISBN: 978-1940014067
Page count: 248pp

A debut coming-of-age memoir set during the civil rights era, as seen through the eyes of a young white girl.

The story elaborates on Barrow’s childhood memories of her family’s caretaker, Amelia, focusing on the family’s move from Chattanooga to New Jersey in 1959, just as racial tensions escalated and civil rights protests gained momentum. Amelia, a thick-set woman with support hose and Coke-bottle glasses whom the family calls “Mimi,” looked after Barrow and her five siblings as their parents lived entitled lives in suburbia. The memoir is largely told in a series of vignettes, and as racial violence plays out on the national stage, its implications are addressed in Barrow’s household. Each story is prefaced by a short description giving cultural context, ranging from the history of the slave-built walls on New England’s Block Island to the sit-ins at department stores across the South to the 1960 presidential election. However, the work’s most satisfying embellishments are the stretches of dialogue between Mimi and the two youngest children, Barrow and her brother Chuck. While Mimi irons, cooks and sews for the family, the youngest are always at her feet, and their conversations undulate with Southern rhythms as Mimi dispenses wise advice and homespun aphorisms. The loose episodic structure resembles the way that children form their worldviews, and Barrow shows how she began to piece together the depth of the racial divide, even in her own home, through overheard conversations and wallflower observations. These moments of reflection on social justice and adult morality thread through scenes of suburban childhood mischief. As Barrow grows, her understanding of Mimi’s strained relationship with her family takes on nuance and emotional depth. The author also shows a knack for the sensory details of afternoons whiled away at the beach or evenings exploring in the woods (“When my feet slid on the dry soil of the steep cliff ridges, I clutched the branches of small bayberry bushes”). Overall, Barrow effectively chronicles the slow fade of youthful earnestness and the searing disappointment of childhood realization.

An affecting tribute that distills larger social themes through a child’s perspective.

ADDITIONAL WORKS AVAILABLE:

CROSSING BACK WITH LILY ANNE (Unpublished)
Fiction and Literature

Before there was a diagnosis, people with “high functioning autism” were labeled idiots, while people with migraine headaches were credited with supernatural abilities. Regardless, these individuals often had extraordinary talents, and they profoundly affected the lives of those around them. Crossing Back With Lily Anne explores three generations on two different continents affected by one man’s autism. It illustrates a true “melting pot” of cultures, with characters living together in Minnesota, while struggling with beliefs created by ancestors in the American south, the mid-west and in Australia


LITTLE CHARLES HITS A HOME RUN (Unpublished)
Health & Medicine

Five easy action steps for the whole family to use to help prevent and detect skin cancers.
View on Amazon


LOBSTER SO BIG HE HAD TO BE THE DEVIL (Unpublished)
Fiction, Literary, Southern Fiction

'Lobster So Being He Had to Be The Devil" has descriptive power worthy of Elizabeth Cox or Lee Smith. It is more than just Southern – it’s heart rendering. The story takes place in an affluent, Southern community in 1953. When a white baby suddenly dies, a complex web of secrets and superstitions is revealed to Helen and her younger sister. Helen must then forge a new place for herself in the hearts of her parents and her African-American caregiver.


SUN PROTECTION FOR LIFE: YOUR GUIDE TO A LIFETIME OF HEALTHY & BEAUTIFUL SKIN
Health & Medicine

This book provides a comprehensive discussion of sun protection issues in America today.

ISBN: 1-57224-419-4
View on Amazon

ONLINE: