Arthur Hailey's new novel shifts from the medical (The Final Diagnosis) to the political arena of controversy, compromise...

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Arthur Hailey's new novel shifts from the medical (The Final Diagnosis) to the political arena of controversy, compromise and concession, and the scene this time is Canada where the Prime Minister, James Howden, is working toward an Act of Union with the U.S. which may encounter great resistance. However, the larger issue is obscured by an internal contretemps; Warrender, his Minister of Immigration, holds to a closed immigration policy which has blocked the entry of a man without a country (Henri Duval who was born at sea) and although Howden does not approve of Warrender's stand, he is Warrender's victim. A private, disreputable deal with Warrender nine years before had made possible his election. The press makes an issue of Duval which jeopardizes Howden, and the Act of Union seems likely to be defeated until one of his subordinates is able to use blackmail to counter blackmail and gives him a reprieve.... Along with the lesson in practical politics, there's a love affair and it is combined and calculated to hold the reader's interest at a popular level.

Pub Date: Jan. 19, 1961

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Doubleday

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 1961