DiakitÆ’ (The Hunterman and the Crocodile, 1997) retells an African folktale--familiar to many children from Slobodkina's...

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THE HATSELLER AND THE MONKEYS: A West African Folktale

DiakitÆ’ (The Hunterman and the Crocodile, 1997) retells an African folktale--familiar to many children from Slobodkina's Caps For Sale (1940)--with a combination of charming storyline, cleverly executed theme, inviting illustrations, and unusual sound effects for read-aloud fun. Tiny monkeys border the pages as readers are introduced to hatseller BaMusa. His head piled high with his dibiri and fugulan caps, and too anxious to eat breakfast, BaMusa starts out for a festival to sell his wares. He falls asleep under a mango tree, only to have a mischievous crowd of monkeys swipe his hard work. Hungry, not thinking straight, BaMusa tries to get the caps back but almost despairs. A meal of the mango fruit gives him the strength to trick the monkeys into relinquishing his inventory. The festive, authentic, painted-tile illustrations match the ebullience of the colorful story; preschoolers will love--again--this smart and satisfying tale of monkey-see, monkey-do.

Pub Date: Feb. 1, 1999

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Scholastic

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 1998