The author, who has previously examined The Love Life of Charles Dickens, performs a slight probing exercise on the body of...

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THE LOVES OF GEORGE BERNARD SHAW

The author, who has previously examined The Love Life of Charles Dickens, performs a slight probing exercise on the body of G.B.S.'s amorous works, from flirtation to philandering. Continent until he was twenty-nine, Shaw eventually built up a love life that at one time had seven women on the hook simultaneously. Yet, he was, the author thinks, physically undersexed or undermotivated, talked a good game, and took his love affairs -- except for those with his first love Alice Lockett and with his last great flame, Mrs. Pat Campbell--lightly. Among the many, there were Jenny atterson, a widow and his senior by some fifteen years, whose sensual attachment over eight years; there were Florence Farr, Janet Achurch for whom he wrote andida, Ellen Terry whom he wooed as much as an actress as a woman on paper, and Mrs. Pat Campbell, his Eliza -- all theatrical loves; among the Fabians, there were Annie Besant, May Morris, Eleanor Marx-Aveling, and his philoprogenitive friend land's wife, E. Nesbit. His marriage to Charlotte Payne-Townshend is proclaimed ow as a farce in its lack of consummation (still a moot point taken for granted ere); it did not alter Shaw's free ways. As he confided to Molly Tompkins in a ate love correspondence, ""Coquettes and philanderers are incorrigible"". Less commanding than Janet Dunbar's recent Mrs. G.B.S., a mild and fairly meaningless diversion.

Pub Date: N/A

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Funk & Wagnalls

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 1963