The sixth novel in the contemporary cycle which began with, and will be known as Strangers and Brothers, and which provoked...

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HOMECOMING

The sixth novel in the contemporary cycle which began with, and will be known as Strangers and Brothers, and which provoked a critical ovation with last year's The New Men. If that book was perhaps more of a challenge, in which one man's conscience as well as man's fate was at stake, this new novel bears a more personalized character dealing as it does with the resolution of Lewis Eliot's emotional life. A reflective man, but always the victim of the reserve which impairs and invalids his relationships, Lewis is seen, a protective and apprehensive figure, during the last months of his marriage to Sheila prior to her suicide. He is still a spectator while engaged in an affair with Margaret, and it is his self-containment which turns her away and into a marriage with another man. The dissolution of that marriage brings Margaret to him- as his wife, but it is only after a crisis in which they almost lose their child that his need for Margaret is finally asserted and ascertains a real ""homecoming"".... An inordinately objective observer, C. P. Snow's leisurely narrative has a cumulative validity; it is also impressive in its breadth and control.

Pub Date: Oct. 5, 1956

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Scribner

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 1956