The nightmare set in motion by Germany must not be forgotten. It is this Forester seems to be seeing in a collection of...

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THE NIGHTMARE

The nightmare set in motion by Germany must not be forgotten. It is this Forester seems to be seeing in a collection of stories that might have happened, tales based on facts elicited from the Nuremberg and Belsen trials. They have their sense of authenticity, as they unfold the horrors of unfettered power. It happened less than a decade ago. People like these people did things that- read in cold blood- seem debased, or horrifying, or so inhuman as to be incredible. There is what might have been the story of the men framed for the Polish attack on the radio station; there are stories of fear at all levels; stories of base betrayal; there is vivid capturing of the uncertainties reflected through the period when the army plotted Hitler's death and overthrow; there are the horrors of the camps- of the refugees- of the gas chambers. One senses the disillusionment in some, the hatred and fear in others- and the unbroken arrogance and blindness in still more. The final story alone seems wholly imaginary, as the author finds himself driving a madman named Adolf, and a tender woman named Eva, up the highway towards San Francisco. A born tale spinner uses novel material.

Pub Date: July 14, 1954

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Little, Brown

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 1954