This is not a second Last Weekend and except for the carrying power of the author's name, unlikely to achieve prominence. In...

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THE FALL OF VALOR

This is not a second Last Weekend and except for the carrying power of the author's name, unlikely to achieve prominence. In handling, it lacks the anatomical authenticity, the intensity, which gave that book its power. In theme, it presents a socially less sympathetic subject than alcoholism, homosexuality, without the distinction of say- Dusty Answer. This is the story of John and Ethel Grandin, happily married for many years until the present when Ethel realises that John has lost his physical interest in her, is too absorbed by his intellectual pursuits as a professor. In two weeks vacation on Kantucket does not serve as a rapprochement. John, in his mid-forties, is self-conscious of his age, his non-participation in the war, and is strangely attracted by his counterpart, Cliff, a Marine officer, whose young masculinity, vitality, are particularly susceptible points of admiration by John. John, in turn, with his superior social, mental background, is to Cliff a source of respect. It is only after John has really been caught by his love for Cliff that he recognizes the nature of his attraction. In admitting it to Ethel, he loses her- gets a sharper, physically violent rejection by Cliff which completes the fall of valor... A credible, in some ways creditable, handling of a touchy theme- in no way offensive, but then again- in no way important.

Pub Date: Oct. 3, 1946

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Rinehart

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 1946