An historical novelist turns to his source material and taking the thirteen short years filled with so much of the history...

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MEN OF THE WESTERN WATERS

An historical novelist turns to his source material and taking the thirteen short years filled with so much of the history that made America -- from the surrender of Cornwallis in late 1871 to the success of Anthony Wayne in the Battle of Fallen Timbers, 1794 -- the author follows the Wilderness Road to reveal the West as it was made American. His concern extends to the ordeals of the settlers, the personalities of leaders from Wilkinson to Clark, the nature of the Indian as an enemy, the nature of the frontiersmen themselves. Threading through the daily struggles of individuals, alone or in groups, who opened the West, is the story of the larger battle of Spain, France, England and the infant U.S.A. to gain the West and of the Indian to keep it without a master. One appendix offers important date references leading to and through the period; a second is comprised of letters between Wayne and Campbell in the 1794 victory that insured the West for America from an England that did not want war.

Pub Date: March 13, 1956

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Houghton, Mifflin

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1956