Kellogg's fame ultimately will rest on the successful outcome of the Pact of Paris, generally called the Kellogg Pact. But...

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FRANK B. KELLOGG

Kellogg's fame ultimately will rest on the successful outcome of the Pact of Paris, generally called the Kellogg Pact. But there is a story behind it, -- another typical story of the poor American boy who rises into fame, through courage, honesty and vision. His life, closely packed with detail, is presented in matter-of-fact fashion. At eight or nine he went with his parents from northern New York to Minnesota. Farm life -- spasmodic education -- reading law in an office at night -- and becoming at 21 a country lawyer, and from there going into politics. The chapter of his share -- with Theodore Roosevelt -- in ""trust busting"" is the most interesting in the book. Senator from Minnesota in 1916, defeated for reelection, president of A B A, Ambassador to Great Britain under Coolidge, Secretary of State. His final position was Judge of the World Court, from which post he retired. The book is recommended to students of American history and American statemen and world affairs, in which he played no small part. A judicious though in no sense a dramatic presentation.

Pub Date: Oct. 22, 1937

ISBN: 116450570X

Page Count: -

Publisher: Putnam

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 1937