None of the sharper dramatic effects of his first book, The Steeper Cliff, or for that matter, The Hour St. Truth this...

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IN ANOTHER COUNTRY

None of the sharper dramatic effects of his first book, The Steeper Cliff, or for that matter, The Hour St. Truth this handles- with considerably less seriousness and some raillery the odyssey of a young American in England, sexually rather than intellectually inclined. In recall, Burgess Miller, who was to become a famous radio news commentator- married to Georgia but sleeping around-, goes back to a season spent in a Mrs. Seam's Bloombury hoarding house, to certain friendships, and to the love for Pamela, bright, wanton, inaccessible (to Burgess), and unforgettable in later years. This also backtracks over his desperate pursuit (at twenty two) of women; one night of adultery; the delayed seduction of Betty an hysterical type; and finally the infatuation for Pamela. This return in time and in memory serves as a release, leads Burgess to the realization that Pamela is only the perpetuation of his immaturity, frees him to take up again his marriage to Georgia... Some fairly facile writing here disguises a rather slack story and an unappealing type, the tentative, thwarted male, though to some his fiascos may be funny.

Pub Date: Oct. 20, 1950

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Random House

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 1950