Hooton's lectures are front page news. His audience a wider one than simply the people who sit under him. Now he has come...

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APES, MEN AND MORONS

Hooton's lectures are front page news. His audience a wider one than simply the people who sit under him. Now he has come into the ranks of scientists who accept the importance of the lay public for scientific findings, and he has put the present science of anthropology on a plane which even the uninitiated will find readable and challenging. With humor, occasionally barbed, with an ability to incorporate solid facts in enlightening and provocative terms, with a lucidity which makes even the terms one skips unimportant to general understanding, he has succeeded in ""popularizing"" anthropology, in raising a critical and balanced attitude out of a dead level of indifference. He gives a comprehensive survey of what has been accomplished; he presents a constructive criticism of the science as it stands today; he makes no bones about his position in this meet question of Race; and he does it all intelligently, entertainingly, tolerantly, and readably. The section on the American Indian is the only part that drags. Occasionally, one is aware of repetition, due to the fact that the material is mainly drawn from lectures given at different times. But on the whole, it is a book that should find some of the market (those interested in the factual rather than the philosophical content) of Carrel.

Pub Date: N/A

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Putnam

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 1937