The Reader's Guide series has always been uneven; some were dreadful (e.g. the Yeats), some were brilliant (e.g. Eliot and...

READ REVIEW

A READER'S GUIDE TO WILLIAM FAULKNER

The Reader's Guide series has always been uneven; some were dreadful (e.g. the Yeats), some were brilliant (e.g. Eliot and Dylan Thomas). The latest, room by room tour of the house that Faulkner built, stands somewhere in the middle. However it eschews the fancier profundities in which almost all American critics have indulged, and its straightforward, unargumentative and appreciative manner attempts no particular overall thesis than to regard the Faulkner canon as ""a spiritual autobiography."" It is comprehensive and concise, conservative rather than controversial. Professor Volpe is most valuable in his long paraphrasings of plot and thematic structure. The concluding section presents a chronology of events and scene shifts of the most recalcitrant of the 19 novels discussed -- an undertaking painstaking and precise enough to make the book a much sought after college tem.

Pub Date: July 27, 1964

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Farrar, Straus & Co.

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 1964