A warm human novel told in the idiom of New York's Seventh Avenue garment district. And as you read you feel it could not...

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SEIDMAN AND SON

A warm human novel told in the idiom of New York's Seventh Avenue garment district. And as you read you feel it could not have been told any other way. Morris Seidman- who tells the story- is a dress manufacturer who has come up the long way from a $14 a week job and a Delancey Street settlement house. But in the process he has lost neither heart nor imagination: his people- he has some 200 working for him- love him and rarely think of him as ""the boss"". Some of them came up with him. His home is a happy one; he is still in love with his wife, though he gets a bit fed up with her high-falutin ideas on modern psychology; Jenny, his daughter, fancies herself as a modern teen-ager who likes to shock the old fashioned parents. But it is Harold, home from Korea, who is the problem. Harold has brought back with him anger against the world of success, ideas about giving the underdog a chance, and conviction that he has a right to air his views- and to right the unrealized grievances of the world. There are some rugged times- at home, in the shop, anywhere where Harold and his father come up against the new wall of misunderstanding. But- throughout- you know that what makes it hard is that both of them are profoundly and both have something to learn about the new world. The story is funny at times- and poignant at others- and always irresistibly appealing. There's a down-to-earth realism here, that is not dependent on shock techniques and four letter words. I loved it. And so will a lot of people who think they are not interested in the garment trade. Book of the Month for June, as dual selection with White's The Mountain Road. Reader's Digest Condensed Book Club selection.

Pub Date: May 26, 1958

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Putnam

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1958