This is enchantment- for those who loved her City of Bells and Island Magic. Here again she has beguiling children-here...

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PILGRIM'S INN

This is enchantment- for those who loved her City of Bells and Island Magic. Here again she has beguiling children-here again she has that fey quality of reflection without over-sentimentalizing the ""trailing clouds of glory"". At times her conversation tends to be a bit esoteric; at other times burdened down with trappings of learning. But in the main it is a charming and appealing story of the disentanglement of tangled lives. The central characters are members of the sprawling Eliot clan- with special focus on George, stolid but good; his lovely wife, Nadine; his brilliant actor-cousin David with whom Nadine is in love; the five small children; their matriarchal grandmother; her spinster daughter, and clergyman son; and the dominant spirit of two houses, Damerosehay, which will eventually belong to David, and the Pilgrim's Inn where the George Eliots settle down to run it as a sort of special survival of the tradition of the ""pilgrim's inn"". Then there are the Adairs, Sally and her artist father, and the strange compulsion that meshes their lives with the Eliots; and the Mahonys, whose tragedy finds surcease and solution in the peace of the Herb of Grace. A lovely book.

Pub Date: March 26, 1948

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Coward-McCann

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1948