Cioran is one of those deep thinkers who may be on to something (Auden) or then again he may not (Updike). Here he is...

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THE TROUBLE WITH BEING BORN

Cioran is one of those deep thinkers who may be on to something (Auden) or then again he may not (Updike). Here he is represented by a collection of random pensees, half a dozen to a page; ""To have foundered between the epigram and the sigh!"" is the way he puts it. And indeed the short form is appropriate since ""There is nothing to say about anything."" Besides, ""tone is more than talent."" Once again Cioran celebrates (if that's the word) the misfortune of being born, and in this relation comments on God and the gods, consciousness, the soul, prayer, madness, failure, suicide, etc. ""My mission is to suffer for all those who suffer without knowing it,"" he cries. As usual it is well said; but just what does it say?

Pub Date: April 14, 1976

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Viking

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 1976