Again the Caldwell philosophy of the cheerful acceptance of defeat ""at the sure hand of God"" in the chronicle of Molly...

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THE SURE HAND OF GOD

Again the Caldwell philosophy of the cheerful acceptance of defeat ""at the sure hand of God"" in the chronicle of Molly Bowser, recently married and more recently divorced, faced with the problem of making a living for herself and for her illegiti daughter, Lily, eighteen in years, eight in mind. With a marriage for Lily as her prime objective, Molly's reputation for free love (promiscuity, not without price) hinders her progress. The first respectable suitor is scared away by his family, until Lily's elopement, with an adolescent neighbor, saves the day. Molly, recharged with her optimism, is soon involved in scandal as the preacher suicides at her house, finishes her chances for respectability, and leaves her to a future as madam of a house of fame. Rather tempered to the tasts of the queasy, this lacks some of Caldwell's but is again for his market.

Pub Date: Oct. 8, 1947

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Duell, Sloan & Pearce

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 1947