This is the second of Ford's fairy tales to have recently been resurrected (cf., The Queen Who Flew 1965, p. 899 - J301)....

READ REVIEW

THE BROWN OWL

This is the second of Ford's fairy tales to have recently been resurrected (cf., The Queen Who Flew 1965, p. 899 - J301). They are quaint collector's items, like Tiffany lamps, and seem more likely to interest adults following the Ford Maddox Ford revival, than most children. The heroine is the Princess Ismara, who at 19 has just become Queen of the Western World, and she manages to carry on the affairs of the land with saucy flirtatiousness. Her support is the mysterious Owl, bequeathed to her by her late father. Actually, it is her father reincarnated; it never leaves her side and is a match for any combatants, including her crafty and belligerent Chancellor, Merrymineral. At the war's end there is a tournament to decide Ismara's suitor; the jousting is carried on with Victorian fussiness. Eventually, the Prince of India wins out by defeating the glamorous but traitorous Knight of London (a transformed Merrymineral) with paper weapons. The story is slightly satirical, sprightly, but antiquated.

Pub Date: March 15, 1966

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Braziller

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1966