This volume demonstrates how brilliantly Grosz caught the life, and more importantly the feverish imagination, of a city and...

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"THE BERLIN OF GEORGE GROSZ: Drawings, Watercolours and Prints, 1912-1930"

This volume demonstrates how brilliantly Grosz caught the life, and more importantly the feverish imagination, of a city and a nation in a particularly turbulent time. Marrying the jumpy lines and figural distortions of cubism to narrative subjects and an angry sense of morality, he illuminated the tawdry, often violent, lives of Berlin's down-and-out, its powerbrokers, and its murderers, during the chaotic Weimar years of the 1920s, in corrosive, unsettling, kinetic images. The drawings and prints of drunken prostitutes and their leering customers, calm murderers inspecting the bodies of their victims, fat businessmen and their voluptuous mistresses, prim bourgeoisie and exhausted workers, and mutilated ex-soldiers, are complemented here by some of Grosz's less familiar, and equally disturbing, watercolors. Whitford, a former lecturer in art history at Cambridge, provides a useful introduction to Grosz's life and times, and detailed and very helpful annotations to the artwork. A superb overview of a unique career.

Pub Date: Aug. 20, 1997

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Yale Univ.

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 1997