Twenty-three interviews from the Playboy fries--including a few (Ayn Rand and Salvador Dali in 1964, William Buckley in...

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THE PLAYBOY INTERVIEW II

Twenty-three interviews from the Playboy fries--including a few (Ayn Rand and Salvador Dali in 1964, William Buckley in 1970) that were never printed in the magazine. Henry Miller, circa 1964, complains that civilization isn't breaking down fast enough, Ian Fleming chats (not very vividly) about writing the James Bond books. There's a very brief, awfully dated 1965 talk with Sartre. But, as usual, the most useful Playboy interviews are not those with relatively heavyweight types (Arnold Toynbee's here too), but those with controversial newsmakers and celebrities: G. Gordon Liddy in 1980; Ku Klux Klan leader Robert Shelton in 1965; Robert Garwood at the time of his court-martial; cult deprogrammer Ted Patrick in 1975; plus the more serious sides of Johnny Carson, Robert Redford, and Groucho Marx (who's more bitter than madcap). And the more recent entries include Lech Walesa Oust before martial law was imposed in Poland), the very ill Henry Fonds, and the pre-gubernatorial Ed Koch. Too dated by and large for rewarding browsing, then, but a generous, fairly representative sampling of a pop-journalism standby.

Pub Date: June 9, 1983

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Perigee/Putnam

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 1983