Earth having been rendered uninhabitable through a series of catastrophes involving the miracle-metal bulerite, mankind has...

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MACROLIFE

Earth having been rendered uninhabitable through a series of catastrophes involving the miracle-metal bulerite, mankind has been given a rather powerful nudge in the direction of the stars. Richard Bulero, grandson of the element's discoverer, is among those who see the real future of humanity in the endless propagation of ""macrolife"": self-contained artificial worlds roaming the cosmos as free and enlightened city-states in eternal quest of knowledge. John Bulero, cloned some thousand years afterward from the preserved cells of Richard's uncle, must re-experience the competing claims of planet and macroworld, and still later participates in the attempt of macrolife to survive the collapse of the universe itself. The force of the basic idea--adopted with literal-minded zeal from the works of Dandridge Cole and Gerard O'Neill--is infuriatingly undermined by Zebrowski's oafish writing (""As Sam watched the reverse eclipse cast Ganymede's moving shadow across Jove's full face, he found it hard to think of today as Saturday morning"") and still more oafish futurological cheerleading.

Pub Date: May 9, 1979

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Harper & Row

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1979