Dramatic in the intensity of its concentration, provocative in its implied rather than overt intent, this again proves the...

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BLACK RAIN

Dramatic in the intensity of its concentration, provocative in its implied rather than overt intent, this again proves the author's ability to blueprint character climax, psychological overtones. For the sustained monotone of a child's memories emphasizes the mounting tensions in his family as a self-centered old aunt comes to live with his parents, and her visit coincides with a manhunt. The piling of little incident on little incident, the importance of each moment's happenings, increase the child's hatred for the old lady, and underline the narrowing search for the fugitive. It is the boy who first realizes where and how the quarry is hidden, and his terror mounts as he realizes that it is in the old lady's power to inform against the man. The climax of the search comes with his parents' decision to send Aunt Valerie on her way. Effective picture of a Norman town and its market place, of the undeclared battle between a child and an adult.

Pub Date: N/A

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Reynal & Hitchcock

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 1947