Like Alfred Hayes, Hans Koningsberger writes rather precise dossiers of intimate attachments (The Affair; An American...

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I KNOW WHAT I'M DOING

Like Alfred Hayes, Hans Koningsberger writes rather precise dossiers of intimate attachments (The Affair; An American Romance), the intimacy here contradicted by the fact that those involved are nameless. Or does the deliberate anonymity imply universality? In this case the girl who knows where she's going, although it doesn't always seem that way, is a Holly Golightly type, a vagrant here and there on the outskirts of life. Fatherless, she's also motherless at 18 when she is left behind in England to take care of herself. Certainly, after this initial abandonment, she remains disengaged, in spite of some passively accepted sexual experimentation in England, on to some indifferent promiscuity when she too comes to the States. That is, until ""the client,"" an older married man, the first to excite her. The long term affair heads nowhere; she leaves him for California and a jazz musician; she returns to ""the client""; and she finally finds that Al, the musician, offers a certain security against ""the threat of the world..."" The book, while it may be almost as transient as its heroine, has some of her attractions, and the tone is casually intense.

Pub Date: Oct. 5, 1964

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: imon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 1964