One of the better novels of this season, in the story of Johnny Schwartz, who as boy and man, rebelled against the censure...

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THE THRESHER

One of the better novels of this season, in the story of Johnny Schwartz, who as boy and man, rebelled against the censure of the small Minnesota wheat-farming community where he lived. First he fought the taint of his heritage; then the religion of Hell and Damnation. The picture of these hard-working, almost fanatically religious, narrow German farmers is extremely well-done. Here is a group of characters which in less skillful hands could have been stereotyped, but under Krause's pen emerge as very real and understandable people with all their problems, their prejudices, their way of life. Johnny is an extraordinarily vigorous character-the rebel who wants respect and power from his fellows and who is so intent on winning both that he cannot see the natural forces of change and progress which finally defeat him. There's an appealing and sad love story. A novel that is both a fine piece of writing and highly satisfying reading, picturing a modern frontier.

Pub Date: Jan. 7, 1947

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Bobbs-Merrill

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 1946