An autobiography in which the man is submerged in the pace of his time, the jass era, but emerges as sane, stable and...

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THE STAR DUST ROAD

An autobiography in which the man is submerged in the pace of his time, the jass era, but emerges as sane, stable and humble, despite his genius for low-down blues. By association, jass means speakeasies, crib houses, opium joints, hopped-up youth, roofers, etc., as in Marow's Really The Blues, but Carmichael shows us here another, and perhaps truer, segment of the era, the intelligensia of jazz. This is the story of his struggle between music and law at the University of Indiana and his circle of friends which included a surrealist writer, musicians who could read music, composers who found inspiration in Ravel and Debussy and in the bayou country as well. Here are Louis Armstrong, Wad Allen, Hostetter, Johnson, the Williams brothers, and Bix Beiderdecke. Erratic and exuberant in jazz style. (A letter by Wad Allen at the close really reveals some of the author's achievements.)

Pub Date: Nov. 9, 1946

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Rinehart

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 1946