The first book we have come across that deals strictly with the Mead-Benedict- Boaz school of cultural anthropology, on a...

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The first book we have come across that deals strictly with the Mead-Benedict- Boaz school of cultural anthropology, on a teen-age level, leaves some things to be desired in the way of successful simplification. But it is on the whole an encouraging interpretation of something that should be part of everyone's education. Much of the book is a re-writing of the material in Ruth Benedict's Patterns of Culture, for example, or Margaret Mead's works. Though they have been sifted and a little jazzed up to make them more palatable to undeveloped tastes, one easily recognizes the accounts of such people as the Arapesh of New Guinea, the Kwakiutl, the Hopi, the Eskimos, the Trobiranders and so forth. But Mr. Block has gathered his material efficiently. He also makes quite clear the very practical aims of anthropology as a study of what is really natural in human behaviour and its method of doing it through an understanding of simpler tribal entities. For youngsters who have not been introduced to the idea that there is any other way but our own, this should prove heady and stimulating.

Pub Date: April 1, 1956

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Watts

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 1956