In between his documentaries and his Report to the Commissioner (1972), this is less of a story qua story and more of a text...

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ONE JUST MAN

In between his documentaries and his Report to the Commissioner (1972), this is less of a story qua story and more of a text (borrowed from Ramsey Clark and others) about ""crime in the streets"" which hasn't a chance in the courts where the innocent are victimized while the guilty make deals. Allan Dori, a lawyer for the Legal Aid Society, who has lost his personal incentive (a wife and son) but not his idealism, decides to encourage guilty pleas to clog the courts and the jails People are packed in the Tombs like ""oldtime slave ships"" with chaos to follow: the services strike, then political riots seem inescapable, while the situation blows up, without bombs, in the blare of the TV cameras, headlines and finally a few pistols. James Mills is always a decisive writer and behind the quixotic reformer's dream of justice, there's a heart as well as an elbow and a fist. They all deliver.

Pub Date: Jan. 21, 1974

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 1974