Mr. Warburg has subtitled this volume ""The Autobiography of a Maverick,"" which amounts to a quite inexplicable attempt to...

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THE LONG ROAD HOME

Mr. Warburg has subtitled this volume ""The Autobiography of a Maverick,"" which amounts to a quite inexplicable attempt to mislead his readers on two counts; first, it should be remarked that there is nothing of the orphaned calf about this distinguished scion of a great Jewish banking family, and secondly, this is almost, as much a chronicle of that family as it is his own story. He realizes that as a history his book is ""sketchy and incomplete,"" while as a memoir it is ""perhaps too heavily loaded with impersonal matters,"" and he apologizes. Yet in any important sense this work requires no apologies, for as he reviews a very full and satisfying life, he is as ruthless a critic and as stern a judge of his own thoughts and actions as one might possibly desire. More or less retired now from public life and dedicated to enjoying his ""second brood"" of children, Mr. Warburg is still the ""citizen extraordinary"" whom Adlai Stevenson placed in ""the great tradition of the 18th century pamphleteers,"" and his reasonable voice has done more than a little to keep the U.S. on the responsible liberal path he has always honored and served. Thus his afterthoughts on some of the great issues of the past 50 years should be welcome, his opinion, that the world today is ""nearer to becoming what I hoped it would be,"" deserves respect.

Pub Date: May 15, 1964

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Doubleday

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1964