One feels that John Marquand has written this book with tongue in cheek at times -- with certain personal bitterness...

READ REVIEW

THE LATE GEORGE APLEY

One feels that John Marquand has written this book with tongue in cheek at times -- with certain personal bitterness yearning for expression -- but with occasional acceptance, albeit unwilling, of the traditions and ideals and standards of his forbears. Certainly he laid aside his accepted role of spinner of yarns. He ignored the established rules of the fiction form. If he did not tap authentic sources in letters and diaries, he deliberately conveyed the impression of authenticity in his manner and matter. And the results? A fictional biography of a gentleman of the old school, Hoston personified in the character of George Apley. He pokes gentle -- or bitter -- fun at Boston and the Bostonians, but he does it out of his character's own mouth and pen. It is the sort of book that every Bostonian will take seriously, even to placing the minor characters. And it is a book that will have its biggest sale, I feel sure, in and around Boston. They wont like it -- but they will read it and talk about it endlessly. Recalls The Perennial Bachelors.

Pub Date: Jan. 4, 1936

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Little, Brown

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 1936