The career of the Royal Navy destroyer Kelly was short (less than two years) but added to the legends of its service for,...

READ REVIEW

THE KELLY

The career of the Royal Navy destroyer Kelly was short (less than two years) but added to the legends of its service for, commanded by Mountbatten, who did not ask for miracles but who was ""bloody disappointed if they don't happen"", its standards and morale and capable performances ranked it high in the fleet. Commissioned in August, 1939, she incorporated all the improvements on the Tribal class, had her trials speeded up, and quickly developed into a happy, efficient, crack fighting ship. Escort, U-boat hunting, a six months arctic tour and a death or glory mission in the Baltic preceded the torpedoing that laid her up for extensive repairs. Then from the Atlantic she proceeded to the Mediterranean, was refitted at Malta and bottled up at Crete. Her end came when she was bombed by German Stukas and those who were trapped at their posts perished when she capsized. The Kipling made possible unbelievable rescues and the Kelly's story is given a personal touch by the accounts of the survivors. The foreword by Admiral the Earl Mountbatten is a tribute to her magnificence in action and to the splendid record of her heroes. A record of the best in naval traditions.

Pub Date: N/A

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Norton

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 1954