Holz begins by reminding her readers that creativity and craftsmanship are equally important but her book won't further...

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TEACH YOURSELF STITCHERY

Holz begins by reminding her readers that creativity and craftsmanship are equally important but her book won't further either. After a survey history of embroidery and the usual preliminary instructions on selecting fabrics and threads and transferring designs, she introduces a few stitches at a time with a suggested project after each group. Thus with the straight stitch alone you can make a notably unimaginative ""sleepy owl"" to decorate a triangle scarf. An apron with a daisy design on the pocket follows instructions for split and chain stitches and French knots, a tote bag with peacocks uses a larger variety of stitches, and the ""most challenging"" creation is a feather, herringbone and blanket stitch lion for a book tote. There are a few more projects appended and Holz urges readers to design their own but her dotted-line approach discourages independence and her black and white photos won't inspire beginners as do Karasz' (1959) ingenuity, Erica Wilson's (1965) traditional expertise, nor the free-wheeling contemporary examples of professionals' and children's work to be found in any number of introductions.

Pub Date: April 26, 1974

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Lothrop, Lee & Shepard

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 1974