M. I. Ross, with South of Zero, established herself as a good story teller with a refreshing and original sense of humor....

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GREENTREE DOWNS

M. I. Ross, with South of Zero, established herself as a good story teller with a refreshing and original sense of humor. This is her second Australian story and for its unusual setting and entertaining yarn, it deserves more than average attention. It isn't as exciting nor as humorous as some of the earlier books, but it has plenty of chuckles, and distinct originality. A young family -- orphaned and poor -- refuses to be parcelled out among the townspeople back home, and take a chance on a grudging offer of an uncle in far-off Australia. They arrive, unmet -- accept the story of his absence -- under a misapprehension assume that a poverty-striken hut is his home -- and set out to make a real home for him whenever he shall return. Adventures pile up -- difficulties are overridden -- and eventually all turns out right. There's a slender thread of romance for girls who are on the border-line of wanting grown-up novels.

Pub Date: Aug. 31, 1937

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Houghton, Mifflin

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 1937