The lively almost-six-year-old introduced in Josie Smith (1988) goes on a typically British outing with her ""Mom"" and...

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JOSIE SMITH AT THE SEASHORE

The lively almost-six-year-old introduced in Josie Smith (1988) goes on a typically British outing with her ""Mom"" and Gran. Having just quarreled with best friend Eileen, she promptly blows her spending money on a present for her. But fair-minded Josie cheerfully endures the consequences of her generosity: each time she foregoes one of the treats she'd anticipated, she shuts her eyes tight as she tells a white lie. about not minding. And after all, there's tea in the thermos when she's thirsty; the man who keeps donkeys gives her a free ride; and Gran tactfully comes up with some of the flags Josie had counted on to decorate her sand castle. Josie is likable, strong-minded; her argument with Eileen, her intense focus on the details of her special day, and her bravely controlled panic when she gets lost are portrayed with exceptional realism, sympathy, and humor. Several details betray the chilly northern setting--e.g., Josie wears her best dress and a sweater--so it seems foolish to translate for Americans by, for example, giving her ""a dollar"" to spend. Still, a well-written story to use as a read-aloud or alone; attractive format with frequent, cheerful drawings.

Pub Date: Aug. 30, 1990

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: 88

Publisher: Margaret K. McElderry/Macmillan

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 1990