A historical from Marguerite de Angeli, very attractively put together and stirringly written, describes one of the many...

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BLACK FOX OF LORNE

A historical from Marguerite de Angeli, very attractively put together and stirringly written, describes one of the many happenings that must have taken place during the Norse migrations to Britain and the merging of peoples it brought about. Our two heroes are Jan and Brus, twin sons of Harald, a Norse lord forced to emigrate by two brothers who have taken his land. Off the coast of Scotland there is disaster; two ships go down and the men are separated from the women. Harald, Jan and their followers are taken by Began Mor, Thane of Skye just as he is marrying his daughter to Gavin Dhu of Lorne, a man who has made allegiance with the English. Brus, who has not been taken, remains in hiding. Then in a tragic fight Harald is killed and Jan imprisoned, but the two boys can replace each other from time to time because they are identical and in this way plot for an eventual escape. As each is able to talk to the Scotch people, they find out about the evil intentions of Began and Gavin. New loyalties begin to form and the boys find themselves becoming Scots, allies of the King, (at whose court they find their lost mother) and new partners in a proud nation.

Pub Date: Sept. 6, 1956

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Doubleday

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 1956