This is a breezier story than Tannen's The Wizard Children of Finn, and it sticks to an everyday contemporary setting--but...

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HUNTLEY NUTLEY AND THE MISSING LINK

This is a breezier story than Tannen's The Wizard Children of Finn, and it sticks to an everyday contemporary setting--but it's far from an ordinary kid sitcom, notwithstanding the cover picture of Huntley's ape in fringed dress and striped muffler. On the first two pages we learn that twelve-year-old Huntley is motherless, no taller than the average six-year-old, and tormented by mean Orson Forest and his gang, the Skulls, who call him ""Runtly"" or ""Mother""--the last because Huntley runs home at lunch time and after school to take care of his three-year-old brother Beau, who is otherwise alone all day. Once this is established you have no trouble accepting Link, the hairy two-legged creature Huntley and Beau find when they slide into the town's dreaded ravine on their tennis-racket snowshoes. The winter is an especially cold one, the creature is shivering miserably, and so Huntley takes it home, checks out the pictures in an old encyclopedia, and decides that it's the Missing Link. The missing link theory is long out-of-date, says Huntley's often-absent, always-absentminded scientist father, who thinks ""Mrs. Link"" is their new housekeeper. But what if they found one, asks Huntley. And when Dad answers that they would take it to a lab, probe and test it, and probably kill it for further testing, Huntley knows that he must keep Link a secret. There is more--much more--trouble with the Skulls, but after Link wins their allegiance with his one amazing talent, beating them all at a video game, the kids start hanging out at Huntley's after school. And so they continue to do even after spring comes and Link returns to the ravine. Good fun, with an imaginative difference.

Pub Date: April 15, 1983

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 1983