Sir Arthur Conan Doyle unintentionally convinced many of his avid readers that he was Sherlock Holmes. Pleas for help poured...

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THE MAN WHO WAS SHERLOCK HOLMES

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle unintentionally convinced many of his avid readers that he was Sherlock Holmes. Pleas for help poured in and, in the widely publicized Edalji and Slater cases, Sir Arthur stepped in to apply the methods of scientific detection that his fictional hero used in advance of many police forces. Not all his causes were popular. However, Sir Arthur was the sort of idealist who was willing to forego a baronetcy in order to speak out for causes he believed in. This short biography reads swiftly and may well stimulate a re-reading of the Holmes cases and lead to the far more complete, authorized biography by John Dickson Carr, The Life of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, which this in no wise replaces. In order to emphasize the cases Doyle worked on, the Hardwicks rush through the early years and slight the private life of their subject. However, the Hardwicks' close reading of Holmes in relation to Sir Arthur's own detecting and ideals makes this interesting pick-up reading.

Pub Date: July 17, 1964

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Doubleday

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 1964