This will be a next to impossible book to sell through conventional channels. It can scarcely be called fiction as there...

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HIGHLAND RIVER

This will be a next to impossible book to sell through conventional channels. It can scarcely be called fiction as there isn't the remotest suggestion of a plot. The subjective record of a young Scot's reactions to life, first as a child, his deeply felt tie to the river, the woods, and during his childhood his two or three captures of salmon or rabbit -- this constitutes what little action there is. He is successful at school, becomes a research scientist, a physicist. From that point the book is a succession of discourses on science per se, on into the realm of metaphysics,the various links between art and science and God and nature, seen through the eyes of this sensitive and oh so mystic highlander. There may be some who might be interested in the spiritual aspects of the book, but 90 pages of pure dialogue with the intangible under the guise of fiction is pretty hard to stomach.

Pub Date: July 29, 1937

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Lippincott

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 1937