With fairytale fragility and charm, this is a pretty pastel of a childhood in France in the early 19th century, of the...

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MY BIRD SINGS

With fairytale fragility and charm, this is a pretty pastel of a childhood in France in the early 19th century, of the orphaned Marcelleaux children. Pauline, Camille and Casette, Casette who was unable to speak because of the death of her mother and the shock of an accident. Isolated, unwanted, uncared for by an uncle, they lead a life of their own in imaginative escapes until the Countess Melanie buys a nearby castle, adopts them, brings Cesette to speak. Pauline, proud and indifferent, even marries for wealth and title. Camille, unhappy away from Melanie, remains untouched by the transition to aristocracy, and falls in love with an English boy and marries him. A sensitivity, a delicacy, distinguishes this and gives it ground for a certain success d'estime in England. Though not for a popular audience, this should find a discriminating following here.

Pub Date: Oct. 17, 1946

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Doubleday

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 1946