Near-future, science-oriented sf with tepid thriller attachments, from the author of The Gates of Heaven and Re-entry. On...

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Near-future, science-oriented sf with tepid thriller attachments, from the author of The Gates of Heaven and Re-entry. On Hawaii, physicist Martin Edovich is using TERAC, the high-powered, US-Japanese particle accelerator, to produce and collect a newly-discovered superheavy particle. (Former weapons researcher Edovich is secretly sending the particles to a Los Alamos lab for a particle beam project.) However, young theoretician Peter Slater, whose math predicted the particle, isn't convinced that the particle is stable. Then a mysterious, fatal explosion occurs; sabotage, in the form of ecological activist Dan Keno, is blamed--but unsavory journalist Gardner Hey smells something fishy. Prodded by sexy photographer Anne-Marie, Slater deduces that the particle is indeed extremely dangerous; TERAC is shut down. But Pentagon loyalist Chauncey Tolliver murders Hey and absconds with the particles--only to cause a huge explosion over Hawaii. Poorly explained science, weak suspense-trappings (blackmail, local color, an inscrutable Japanese or two): glum, ponderous sf-melodrama overall.

Pub Date: Oct. 7, 1983

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Timescape/Pocket Books--dist. by Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 1983