Here's the Avery Hopwood Fiction Award winner for 1945- and this, almost alone of student awards, seems to produce a high...

READ REVIEW

CLEMENTINE

Here's the Avery Hopwood Fiction Award winner for 1945- and this, almost alone of student awards, seems to produce a high percentage of newcomers who have proved better than one book authors.... A chronology with funny, tender highspots, that manages growing pains without parody or maudlinity, that avoids soul searchings while offering cubit- adding, in which young Clem, from 10 to 16, achieves a balance between her burning desire to be a boy, competing on equal terms with boys, and the necessity of becoming a young lady. In the life of the small Indiana town, where her father is Mayor, Clem drives her parents to despair with her hoydenish behavior, her rebellion against any resemblance to a girl -- in looks or actions- and focuses her rivalry on Hank, who is the one to make her cry ""uncle"" in a fist fight. Clem tries to run away, is eased through ""pooberty"" by the humorous understanding of a teacher; acquires distaste for a friend whom Hank is now squiring; wins an oratorical contest against Hank; learns a few feminine tricks; goes to New York by herself and has an enlightening stay; and on her return she and Hank discover they love each other, just as the war starts... Very pleasant, lightly subsurface tale of adolescence, which sneaks up on you.

Pub Date: June 28, 1946

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Dutton

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 1946